A simple cold isn’t so simple

Catching a cold normally would not bother me much, but since my spinal cord injury it causes all kinds of issues. I can deal with the sore throat, runny nose, and congestion, but the extra pain and spasms it causes are unbearable at times, sending my pain soring to an 8+ at times. The overall skin sensitivity is also elevated making it difficult to get dressed and move around.

Most people when they catch a cold are still able to somewhat function and don’t have to worry about loosing bladder function. Unfortunately for me, getting a cold means stronger more severe muscle spams in my back which then trigger my bladder to want to empty. Even if I have just gone it will still trigger the response and I have to make a mad dash for the nearest restroom. Just another fun issue associated with living with a spinal cord injury.

Having a cold also reeks on my spasticity. It increases the muscle stiffness and the rate at which my muscle tire. Most people tend to tire more easily when they have a cold, but they can continue to do things like go to work or pick up a bit around the house. For me, it makes just getting out of bed a massive task. The stiffness in my legs is intense and makes them feel like they weigh 100 lbs a piece. Walking becomes more difficult because my legs feel like they are dragging through heavy cement and my balance is reduced even more than normal.

Being sick with a common cold suck for everyone, but it has much more of an impact on those of us with impaired bodies. From increased pain and exacerbation spasticity it is not just a simple cold. The only way to stop it is prevention. I do my part by washing my hands frequently, staying away from those who appear to be ill, take my supplements drink plenty of water and get plenty of rest. Now all we need is for others to do their part-Stay home when you are sick and do not share your germs.

Published by Denise Rogers

I am a wife, mother, stepmother and grandmother who enjoys spending time with family and friends, crafting, gardening, and I am learning to live with being disabled. In 2017, after my 8th thoracic spinal surgery, I lost all feeling from the waist down as well as losing my proprioception on the right side. This has made it difficult to stand without assistive devices and made it, so I am having to relearn to walk. Plus, I have another uncommon condition called Chiari Malformation Type 1 which also creates balance issues as well as many other health issues. Because of the Chiari and the spinal cord injury, I have been left with severe nerve damage which causes a great deal of pain (5 and greater on pain scale) as well as spasticity, muscle spasms, and allodynia (burning) in various areas of my body. I have endured 8 surgeries on my Thoracic Spine and will probably need more as the drain that was placed will eventually clog and require replacement. Currently, I have a spinal to pleural cavity shunt, which drains the CSF from my arachnoid cysts into my pleural cavity. Professionally, I am a retired Health Care Professional with over 26 years of experience. I have worked in the Public Health realm as well as in Long Term Care and Acute Care. I have a B.A. in Sociology with an emphasis in Social Work. It is my hope that through sharing my personal trials, experiences, and triumphs that I can help others keep moving forward. No matter what life throws at us we can always tell a better story. I know that God is with me and because of this anything is possible. His promise to be by my side every step of the way helps me to keep pushing on even when there are setbacks.

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